Social Media and Divorce

Social Media and Divorce

May 12, 2021
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Since the pandemic began, social media has enabled us to stay in contact with each other. It has been a blessing for many of us but oversharing on the platform may cause issues in your divorce. Your social media accounts can be an evidentiary goldmine. It is important to be aware of what you are posting as your divorce progresses.

 

Follow these tips to prevent your social media from impacting your divorce:

 

  1. Do not post anything that you would not want read in a courtroom. Social media is a permanent record of all your inner most thoughts and it is important to consider the impact of the post.

 

  1. Institute a cooling off period. After a frustrating conversation or baiting post, you may feel tempted to post how you are feeling and your exact thoughts on the grief causing matter. Instead of posting, go for a walk and allow yourself to cool off. The next day you can reconsider the situation and determine if it would actually be beneficial to post.  

 

  1. Do not put newly purchased items online. While it may feel tempting to celebrate gifting yourself with a luxury item, this can cause problems in your divorce. What seems like an innocent event can cost you time and money if the court asks about it.

 

  1. Avoid posting about your divorce. Anything divorce related should be kept off the platform, after all it is a permanent record and can be used to paint you in an unflattering light.

 

  1. Unfriend in-laws. It may seem harsh, but creating separation between extended family members and you helps protect your interests. Blood is thicker than water.

 

  1. Your social media can be subpoenaed. Nothing is truly deleted from the internet so help your future self out by only posting cute cat pictures.

 

Remember the internet lives forever. If you would to replace fear with facts, contact 402.430.3092/ 424.218.0227 or email hello@mywealthanalytics.com today!

 

 

This information is for general education purposes; this is not to be considered legal/ tax/ or financial advice.